Recruit, Retain & Celebrate Sports Officials

How To Become A LaCrosse Official

Lacrosse is one of the fastest-growing team sports in the United States. The need for officials for the boys and girls games has never been higher, and the sport offers opportunities to officiate throughout the year.

Why real officials love what they do

Big games, the roar of the crowd, the anticipation, getting ready for the game beforehand. There is a feeling there that I really enjoyed as a player, and officiating has provided me with that same feeling again.

Taylor EbsaryBuffalo, NY., current boys official.

You gotta get into this, this is a great way to get active, make great money, meet nice people and have a really good time

Alexandria MezzanotteForest Hill, MD., current girls official.

Things To Consider

Physical Demands

Lacrosse is generally officiated by two officials on a football or soccer size field. Officials are moving constantly, and there are limited opportunities to rest while play is going on. Officials typically run from 3-5 miles during a competitive lacrosse game and games are outdoors in all types of different weather.

Mental Demands

Lacrosse officials work with different partners throughout the season. During each game, the official will shift their responsibilities, so knowledge of the entire game and each position is critical. Lacrosse officials are very close to the players and coaches and must be able to focus and ignore distractions. Communication with your partners, coaches and players is critical to being able to officiate this game successfully.

Training

Lacrosse officials are required to attend training and development every year. You will have to learn the positioning and the rules for the game you are officiating. The boys and girls games are very different in both the rules and position and most officials only officiate one or the other. You must also finally pass an on-field evaluation prior to being certified.

Equipment

At minimum an official must have:

  • A short sleeved striped official shirt
  • Black shorts, black socks and belt
  • A black piped hat or black hat
  • A whistle
  • 1 or 2 penalty flags

Estimated Cost: $100-$200 depending level. Once you join a local organization, there may be discounts or veteran officials to help you get geared up at a reduced cost.

Game Fees

Game fees vary widely depending on where you are in the country and what level you are officiating. Youth game fees range from $45 – $60 and $55 – $95 for high school games. To maximize your income, you can work summer and fall tournaments and multiple games in a day.

Certification

As the sport of lacrosse grows and evolves, so do the rules and procedures at all of levels of the game. The purpose of the US Lacrosse Officials Certification Program is to develop knowledgeable and prepared lacrosse officials at every level of the game.

In order to achieve this, an official must:

  • Undergo continued standardized training in order to stay current in the game
  • Always consider the level of play when officiating
  • Promote the safety of the participants
  • Promote fair play and sportsmanship
  • Work to improve their skill level as an official by moving up to higher levels of certification.

US Lacrosse certification has been developed – and continues to improve – with these goals in mind. Visit: uslacrosse.org/officials/officials-certification

Here’s the path for starting and continuing your officiating career

High School and Youth

USLacrosse
2 Loveton Circle
Sparks, MD 21152
410-235-6882

US Lacrosse is the national governing body for the sport of lacrosse. Through them you can get all the information you need to register and become a lacrosse official.

Begin your lacrosse officiating journey at uslacrosse.org/becomeanofficial

National Association of Sports Officials

You may also consider joining NASO, the only nation-wide officials support organization. As a member-driven community; NASO exists to unite, celebrate, develop and protect all officials so that they can reach their goals and take pride in their contributions to the benefits that sports provide society.

Learn more about NASO at NASO.org.

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